Archive for the ‘Coloring Book art’ Category

Good Friday

Friday, April 6th, 2012

Earlier this week I had a little fun with the secular side to what many people call Easter, but to the Jews this is the Passover celebration, and to those who follow the New Testament of the Bible, this is the celebration of the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ.

Born of Jewish lineage (traceable to Israel’s second king, David, and earlier), Christ was celebrating Passover with His twelve apostles at the beginning of the events that this weekend celebrates. He had spent the past few years fulfilling Old Testament prophecy as the Messiah which many rejected in Israel. That night after the Passover supper, Christ was betrayed by one of His apostles, Judas Iscariot, into the hands of Roman soldiers and was ultimately slain on a wooden cross. As the Bible states in the books Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, Jesus was buried, and then raised Himself back to life three days later. The purpose of these actions was that, following the Jewish tradition of killing an animal as a sacrifice for sin, Christ’s death was an act of the ultimate sacrifice to take upon Himself the sins of mankind past, present and future – something that could only truly be taken on by the Creator himself. Death wouldn’t have been enough. His resurrection proved His authority as God. That, in a nutshell, is what Easter is all about to true Christians.

A few years back I drew over 500 coloring book style pictures for a Sunday school curriculum called Generations of Grace. In 2009 I shared with you here on the blog many drawings from the Resurrection series of events, with a much more detailed biblical account of the meaning of Easter. If you would like to see those, feel free to CLICK HERE.

Today’s drawing is a part of that series not shared before. These are some stand alone figures from Christ’s death that Sunday school teachers could use with the kids to color and cut out to create their own Mt. Calvary (Golgotha) scene. These figures are a companion drawing to the bigger coloring page that you can see HERE.

 

Jesus on the Cross

"For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life." John 3:16

 

So why is Good Friday good? Because it represents Christ giving up His life for me. Sunday represents His power over death which shows his authority to die for me in the first place! It is humbling thought.

I know that not everyone will enjoy today’s post, but I didn’t make up the events of which I speak. While I may not be the most eloquent at explaining them, they are the foundation of my faith and can all be found in the Bible both in Old Testament prophecy and New Testament fulfillment. They are events for which I am literally eternally grateful.

 

From time to time, folks write for permission to use my Bible coloring sheet pictures, but please note that their use is currently limited to the Generations of Grace Bible curriculum for which they were drawn. There are three years worth of children’s Sunday lessons broken up into various categories such as the Resurrection, so feel free to CLICK HERE to learn more about that.

MONSTER MONTH: Day 18 – I Scream You Scream…

Sunday, October 18th, 2009

…we ALL scream about how this monster got his ice cream!

Well, the Good Humor man has had better days than this. Lesson learned – don’t get in the way of a monster and his ice cream! Well, that and it’s probably a good idea to finish college so you can get a desk job.

By the way you kiddies - the ice cream man is just taking a nap in some melted strawberry ice cream. Shhhh. Don't wake him.

By the way you kiddies - the ice cream man is just taking a nap in some melted strawberry ice cream. Shhhh. Don't wake him.

The Death & Resurrection of Jesus Christ – Part 5

Sunday, April 12th, 2009

Welcome to Resurrection Sunday. For those who believe that Jesus was the fulfillment of Messianic prophesy, today is an exciting celebration! While Friday was the day that displayed Jesus’ humanity with the taste of death, today is the day He truly showed His deity by rising from the dead. Let us continue the account from the Bible illustrated with my drawings created for the Generations of Grace Sunday school curriculum.

As the Jews were strict with their traditions, they could not have bodies remaining on crosses on the Sabbath day (John 19:31) which was the day following Christ’s crucifixion. So they requested that Pilate have the legs broken of Jesus and the two other criminals that were crucified with Him to hasten their deaths (suffocation would likely occur).  As Jesus had already expired, His legs were not broken which fulfilled the prophecy of Psalm 34:20 in the Old Testament.

A wealthy man named Joseph from Arimathea (Matthew 27:57-60) offered to take Jesus’ body and bury it in the stone tomb he had planned to have himself buried in one day. A great stone was rolled in front of the doorway. The following day, the chief priests and Pharisees remembered Christ’s prophecy that He would rise from the dead on the third day after His death. They asked Pilate for guards be placed by the tomb so that Christ’s followers couldn’t sneak in, steal the body, and claim Jesus had risen. Pilate agreed and established a round-the-clock watch. (Matthew 27:62-66)

According to accounts in Luke 24, on the morning of the third day, Mary Magdalene and Mary, the mother of James, were among several women who went down early to the tomb hoping to get in to treat Christ’s body with spices. Even the most faithful such as these did not believe Jesus would conquer death. When they arrived, they were shocked to discover that the huge stone that blocked the doorway had been rolled away. When they looked into the tomb, they saw there was no body. Two angels spoke to them saying, “Why seek ye the living among the dead? He is not here, but is risen…” (Luke 24:5-6).

 

"Now upon the first day of the week, very early in the morning, they came unto the sepulchre, bringing the spices which they had prepared, and certain others with them. And they found the stone rolled away from the sepulchre." - Luke 24:1-2

"Now upon the first day of the week, very early in the morning, they came unto the sepulchre, bringing the spices which they had prepared, and certain others with them. And they found the stone rolled away from the sepulchre." - Luke 24:1-2

 

If one looks at all four of the Gospel books (Matthew, Mark, Luke, John), one would see all the details of what occurred at the tomb. An earthquake shook, angels appeared which scared the guards silly (Matthew 28 says they became like “dead men”), and an angel rolled back the stone. The guards took off and were later paid for their silence (Matthew 28:11-15) while the women ran back to tell the disciples that the Lord was RISEN!

Apparently even Jesus’ own disciples never believed He would rise again, for the news from the women was met with disbelief. Two of the men ran back to the tomb with them to see for themselves, after which Christ appeared to Mary Magdalene in the cemetary (John 20:11-18). He started appearing to others as well that day such as to Peter (Luke 24:34), a couple traveling to Emmaus (Luke 24:13-32), and to the disciples in Galilee (Luke 24:36-49) where He appeared in a room that had all entrances shut.

 

"And he said unto them, 'Why are ye troubled? and why do thoughts arise in your hearts? Behold my hands and my feet, that it is I myself: handle me, and see; for a spirit hath not flesh and bones, as ye see me have.' And when he had thus spoken, he shewed them his hands and his feet." - Luke 24:38-40

"And he said unto them, 'Why are ye troubled? and why do thoughts arise in your hearts? Behold my hands and my feet, that it is I myself: handle me, and see; for a spirit hath not flesh and bones, as ye see me have.' And when he had thus spoken, he shewed them his hands and his feet." - Luke 24:38-40

 

That one surprised them, but to assure His disciples He wasn’t a vision, Jesus showed them his hand and foot wounds, and even ate some broiled fish and honey (Luke 24:41-43). Christ continued to make appearances to His faithful after that, even to over five hundred people at once (I Corinthians 15:6-7).

After forty days of these visits, Jesus had one last talk with His remaining eleven disciples (Judas had committed suicide under the guilt of his betrayal in Matthew 27:3-10). Acts 1:2-11 talks about Jesus’ parting words encouraging them to continue showing how only He “is the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but..” through Him. (John 14:6) Then He just ascended into heaven promising to one day physically return. That day is what Christians continue to look forward to even now.

 

"And it came to pass, while he blessed them, he was parted from them, and carried up into heaven. And they worshipped him, and returned to Jerusalem with great joy:" - Luke 24:51-52

"And it came to pass, while he blessed them, he was parted from them, and carried up into heaven. And they worshipped him, and returned to Jerusalem with great joy:" - Luke 24:51-52

 

In ancient times, God demanded of His people that a blood sacrifice was to be made for the forgiveness of sins. Hebrews 9 speaks of this, and specifically in verse 22 it says, “And almost all things are by the law purged with blood; and without shedding of blood is no remission.” The Jews followed this practice with animal sacrifice, most often using the most perfect lamb from their flocks to do so. Throughout Scripture, Jesus is referred to as “the Lamb of God” as He was the New Testament replacement for animal sacrifice. “So Christ was once offered to bear the sins of many;and unto them that look for him shall he appear the second time without sin unto salvation.” (Hebrews 9:28) 

How does one get in on the benefits of Christ’s sacrifice? Acts 16:31 says, “…Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and thou shalt be saved…” and Romans 10:9 says, “That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved.” It’s open to anyone in whatever situation your life has led you to at this point.

This concludes my posts on the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ that took place this week all those many years ago. As you can see,  His sacrifice and the miracle of His return from the grave are together what defines true Christianity, and what makes Easter Sunday so special.

The Death & Resurrection of Jesus Christ – Part 4

Saturday, April 11th, 2009

Over the past few days I’ve been writing about the historical biblical order of events that took place during this week a couple thousand years ago in Israel during the traditional observance of Passover, illustrated with my children’s Bible lesson drawings from the Generations of Grace curriculum. Whether you are a believer in Christ as Messiah or not, those events, that only took a few days to occur, have influenced all of humanity ever since.

Good Friday, yesterday, is widely observed as the day that Jesus was slain. As mentioned in yesterday’s post, Christ was tried, found innocent of any crime, but due to the angry will of the people (who earlier in the week had welcomed Him with open arms and palm branches), He was brutally whipped and turned over to be executed. (Matthew 27:26)

The Bible is pretty detailed about the treatment of Christ leading up to His execution, specifically in Matthew 27:27-34. First, the Roman soldiers had their fun – they stripped Him, put a red robe on Him, and pushed a ring of thorns onto His head as a mock crown while taunting Him with “Hail, King of the Jews!” They spit on Him and beat Him more. It was the custom of the day with crucifixions to have the guilty party drag their own cross through the streets to the place of execution. The soldiers had so badly beaten Christ that they had to recruit a fella on the sidelines (Simon of Cyrene) to carry Jesus’ cross for Him.

Once they reached the hill of Golgotha, Jesus was nailed to the cross with big spikes. One historian I read described the ancient practice of crucifixion as such:

“A painful and slow means of execution which the Romans adopted from the Phoenicians. The victim usually died after two or three days, of thirst, exhaustion, and exposure. The hands were often nailed to the crossbeam, which was then hoisted up and affixed to the upright, to which the feet were then nailed. A peg, astride which the victim sat, supported the main weight of the body. Death was sometimes hastened by breaking the legs, but not in Christ’s case (John 19:33)”

 

While not wanting to be too graphic in drawing a torturous moment, I did want children to realize the sacrifice involved in Christ's death, so there is a hint of blood dripping from His hand in the foreground. I didn't draw other coloring book drawings of Christ's torture - just this key moment.

While not wanting to be too graphic in drawing a torturous moment, I did want children to realize the sacrifice involved in Christ's death, so there is a hint of blood dripping from His hand in the foreground. I didn't draw other coloring book drawings of Christ's torture - just this key moment.

 

While I have summarized these events, the Bible is even more specific with these matters in Matthew 27, Mark 15, Luke 23, and John 19. They are the utterly fascinating accounts written by two eyewitnesses (Matthew and John) and two who heard about it from the disciples later (Mark and Luke). I encourage you to look them up and read them for yourselves.

Tomorrow is Easter Sunday, but as many of Christ’s followers like to refer to it – Resurrection Sunday. I’ll conclude my comments on these events with a couple more drawings tomorrow morning.

The Death & Resurrection of Jesus Christ – Part 3

Friday, April 10th, 2009

Welcome to Part 3 in this week’s series on the events in the life of Jesus during his last Passover week illustrated with my coloring book style drawings created for the Generations of Grace Sunday school curriculum.

During the Last Supper that Christ had with his disciples, Peter made the bold statement to Jesus, “Though all men shall be offended because of thee, yet will I never be offended.” (Matthew 26:33) Up to that point, the disciples probably hadn’t experienced too much persecution for their newfound faith in Christ. Jesus replied to Peter, “Verily I say unto thee, that this night, before the cock crow, thou shalt deny me thrice.” (Matt. 26:34) Jesus knew what was to come, The prophecy outlined in Isaiah 53:7 said about the Messiah that:

“He was oppressed, and he was afflicted, yet he opened not his mouth: he is brought as a lamb to the slaughter, and as a sheep before her shearers is dumb, so he openeth not his mouth.”

 

"Now the feast of unleavened bread drew nigh, which is called the Passover. And when the hour was come, He sat down, and the twelve apostles with Him." - Luke 22:1, 14

"Now the feast of unleavened bread drew nigh, which is called the Passover. And when the hour was come, He sat down, and the twelve apostles with Him." - Luke 22:1, 14

 

After Jesus’ arrest, He was eventually brought before Caiaphas (the high priest) who held a closed religious trial late that night without first charging Christ with a crime and without following the legal proceedings of the day. Many false witnesses were brought forth that could not pin anything on Jesus, and all the while He stood there in silence as the Isaiah prophecy stated. Caiaphas eventually asked Jesus, “I adjure thee by the living God, that thou tell us whether thou be the Christ, the Son of God.” (Matt. 26:63) Jesus responded in verse 64, “Thou hast said: nevertheless I say unto you, Hereafter shall ye see the Son of man sitting on the right hand of power, and coming in the clouds of heaven.” Jesus accepted the claim that He was God come in the flesh as the Messiah would claim. Caiaphas charged Jesus with blasphemy.

While Christ’s illegal trial was taking place, Peter was outside keeping to himself most likely waiting to see what was happening with Jesus. He certainly was fearful of what might happen to a follower of Christ on that night. Matthew 26:69-75 recounts how Peter denied that he knew Jesus three times to random inquiries from strangers. A rooster crowed after the third denial, thus fulfilling Jesus’ suppertime prophesy of Peter’s impending behavior.

 

"Now Peter sat without in the palace: and a damsel came unto him, saying, Thou also wast with Jesus of Galilee. But he denied before them all, saying, I know not what thou sayest." - Matthew 26:69-70

"Now Peter sat without in the palace: and a damsel came unto him, saying, Thou also wast with Jesus of Galilee. But he denied before them all, saying, I know not what thou sayest." - Matthew 26:69-70

 

Israel was under the control of the Romans at this time. Caiaphas’ trial did not have the authority, being under the Roman government, to measure out capital punishment. In the morning, the Jews took Jesus before the Roman governor Pontius Pilate who, after reviewing Christ’s case, said in John 18:38, “I find in him no fault at all.” 

It was customary to grant freedom to one prisoner as a part of the Passover celebration. Pilate was all ready to release Jesus, but the people wanted Jesus’ blood. Also in captivity was an infamous prisoner named Barabbas. Pilate said, “Whom will ye that I release unto you? Barabbas, or Jesus which is called Christ?” (Matthew 27:17) The people unanimously chose the evil Barabbas, and demanded that Christ be crucified (Matthew 27:21-23).

 

"The governor answered and said unto them, 'Whether of the twain will ye that I release unto you?' They said, Barabbas.'" - Matthew 27:21

"The governor answered and said unto them, 'Whether of the twain will ye that I release unto you?' They said, Barabbas.'" - Matthew 27:21

 

“When Pilate saw that he could prevail nothing, but that rather a tumult was made, he took water, and washed his hands before the multitude, saying, ‘I am innocent of the blood of this just person: see ye to it.’ Then answered all the people, and said, ‘His blood be on us, and on our children.’ Then released he Barabbas unto them: and when he had scourged Jesus, he delivered him to be crucified.” – Matthew 27:24-26

While today, Good Friday, is the day that is observed for Christ’s death on the cross, I will post that part of the events tomorrow.

The Death & Resurrection of Jesus Christ – Part 2

Thursday, April 9th, 2009

Here are some more drawings depicting the events in the life of Jesus during his last Passover week. They were done a few years ago for the Generations of Grace Sunday school curriculum.

The religious leaders of the day really did not care for Christ. According to Matthew 23, Jesus taught at the temple and openly confronted the scribes and Pharisees calling them out on their hypocrisy. Later in Matthew 26:3-5, the Jewish religious leaders plotted to kill Christ:

“Then assembled together the chief priests, and the scribes, and the elders of the people, unto the palace of the high priest, who was called Caiaphas, And consulted that they might take Jesus by subtilty, and kill him. But they said, ‘Not on the feast day, lest there be an uproar among the people.’”

They didn’t wish to garner ill will among the people by taking Jesus down on day of the Passover celebration, but their opportunity would come soon enough.

Enter Judas Iscariot – whether or not you are familiar with the Bible, Judas is probably a familiar figure. Not too many children today are named “Judas” because his name is synonymous with “traitor”. He was one of Jesus’ twelve disciples who had been in constant contact with the Son of God seeing His practice AND His preaching. Judas covertly went to the priests in Matthew 26:15 and said, “What will ye give me, and I will deliver Him unto you?” The priests hired him for thirty pieces of silver with the agreement that Judas would betray Christ to them. They had their inside man.

 

"Then one of the twelve, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests,and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for thirty pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15

"Then one of the twelve, called Judas Iscariot, went unto the chief priests,and said unto them, 'What will ye give me, and I will deliver him unto you?' And they covenanted with him for thirty pieces of silver." Matthew 26:14-15

 

The Last Supper, as it is so commonly called (probably because of Leonardo da Vinci’s famous painting) was actually Jesus and His disciples celebrating the traditional Jewish Passover feast. Jesus knew He was going to be crucified as that was His purpose. As the Son of God, He was the perfect sacrificial “lamb” that would die for the sins of mankind, and He was okay with that – and He knew  that Judas would betray Him. Christ says in Matthew 26:24-25:

“‘The Son of man goeth as it is written of him: but woe unto that man by whom the Son of man is betrayed! it had been good for that man if he had not been born.’ Then Judas, which betrayed him, answered and said, ‘Master, is it I?’ He said unto him, ‘Thou hast said.’”

 

"And He took bread, and gave thanks, and brake it, and gave unto them, saying, 'This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me.' Likewise also the cup after supper, saying, 'This cup is the new testament in my blood, which is shed for you.'" Luke 22:19-20

"And He took bread, and gave thanks, and brake it, and gave unto them, saying, 'This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me.' Likewise also the cup after supper, saying, 'This cup is the new testament in my blood, which is shed for you.'" Luke 22:19-20

 

After dinner, Christ took Peter, James and John with Him to the garden of Gethsemane (Matthew 26:36-46) where He asked them to stay behind and be a watch while He went on a little further to pray. His prayer to God was filled with such agony. He didn’t fear physical pain, nor the actions of man. Jesus was about to experience the full cup of divine wrath for the sins of mankind. And His disciples couldn’t stay awake as He had asked them to.

 

"And He left them, and went away again, and prayed the third time, saying the same words. Then cometh He to His disciples, and saith unto them, 'Sleep on now, and take your rest: behold, the hour is at hand, and the Son of man is betrayed into the hands of sinners.'" Matthew 26:44-45

"And He left them, and went away again, and prayed the third time, saying the same words. Then cometh He to His disciples, and saith unto them, 'Sleep on now, and take your rest: behold, the hour is at hand, and the Son of man is betrayed into the hands of sinners.'" Matthew 26:44-45

 

Not long after this prayer to God, Judas “came, and with him a great multitude with swords and staves, from the chief priests and elders of the people.” (Matthew 26:47) Judas had told the fellas with him that the one he kissed was the one they could arrest (v. 48). As he did so, you can almost hear the snear in his voice when in verse 49 Judas says, “Hail, master,” then kissed Jesus. This moment holds such historic resonance even today as it is the origin of our saying “the kiss of death”.

 

"Now he that betrayed Him gave them a sign, saying, 'Whomsoever I shall kiss, that same is he: hold him fast.' And forthwith he came to Jesus, and said, 'Hail, master;' and kissed him." Matthew 26:48-49

"Now he that betrayed Him gave them a sign, saying, 'Whomsoever I shall kiss, that same is he: hold him fast.' And forthwith he came to Jesus, and said, 'Hail, master;' and kissed him." Matthew 26:48-49

 

Come back tomorrow – Good Friday, to see and read more about the significance of this week in the life, death, and life again of Christ.

The Death & Resurrection of Jesus Christ – Part 1

Wednesday, April 8th, 2009

In light of this being the Easter/Passover week, it seemed like the most appropriate time to break out some of my Bible drawings that deal with the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ that took place this very week almost 2000 years ago.

A few years ago my church decided to take on the task of creating a professional looking Sunday school curriculum which they called Generations of Grace. Over the course of five years, three years’ worth of Sunday lessons were written by a team of theologians, and in a coloring book style, I drew most of the art used. The curriculum was planned so that all the elementary aged kids in a church will learn the same lesson on the same day at their own grade level. That way if you have several kids, all your children will learn the same thing that day. It has worked out pretty well, and from what I understand, it is being used in churches all over the country, and even in some international locations.

Since last Sunday is widely referred to as “Palm Sunday” by Christians, today I’ll post a drawing of Christ entering Jerusalem on a donkey (as prophesied in Zechariah 9:9) for the observance of Passover as accounted in Matthew 21. 

 

"And the multitudes that went before, and that followed, cried, saying, Hosanna to the son of David: Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord; Hosanna in the highest."  Matthew 21:9

"And the multitudes that went before, and that followed, cried, saying, Hosanna to the son of David: Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord; Hosanna in the highest." Matthew 21:9

 

The priests and Pharisees, seeing Jesus as a threat to their traditions, already had it out for Him (Matt. 21:15). Christ had become accepted among the people of Israel as word of His miracles (recently raising Lazarus from the dead being one of renown) had spread. The city was crowded as it was the week of Passover. As John 12:13 states, the people “took branches of palm trees, and went forth to meet Him, and cried, ‘Hosanna: Blessed is the King of Israel that cometh in the name of the Lord.’”

The Israelites wanted Jesus to be their earthly king, but He had come as the Messiah to deliver them from their own wickedness which held no interest for them. Later that week, when they realized He was not delivering them from Rome, their mood turned….